Birds of Early Spring: From the Lake

Great Blue Heron

There is a park close to home that I probably don’t visit as often as I should. It has a series of hiking and mountain-biking trails, along with a lake that many people use for fishing, kayaking, and even a bit of birding.

As I’ve recently promised myself to start spending more time there, especially now that the weather’s getting warmer, I took my camera and went for a long walk last Tuesday morning. It was a gorgeous, sunny day, and I was able to get some photographs that I think are worth sharing.

Mallard (male)

I’m also glad I took plenty of bird seed with me because the Mallards and Canada Geese who hang out by the lake were not at all shy about approaching me for a meal.

I hope you enjoy.

Double-crested Cormorant
Canada Goose
Mallard (male, left and female, right)
Canada Goose
Double-crested Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant
Canada Goose
Great Blue Heron

23 responses to “Birds of Early Spring: From the Lake”

  1. I’ve long adored, and been flabbergasted by, that long stiletto beak of the Great Blue. One or two come up here all the way to my river in Quebec, and wait more still than the most talented mime. In NJ, flocks of cormorats used to hang out under the metallic bridges of the Passaic River o hot summer days, their gullets panting in the glaring heat. And soon, maybe 2 weeks, the mergansers will arrive here, showing off their diving fishing prowess. Yes — waterbirds are a pure delight.

    Liked by 2 people

    • They certainly are! That heron made my day. I had expected to see waterfowl and the cormorants, as well. But the heron was a surprise. I had put my camera away and was heading back to the car when I spotted him/her through the trees. So, I climbed down to the water’s edge, and the heron didn’t seem to mind that I was there. That was the closest I’ve ever been to one, and it was such a majestic sight. You’re right–so still and so regal. The mergansers should be a delight for you. And I’m not sure if you have Wood Ducks where you are, but they are very beautiful. I had hoped to come across a few, but, alas, it was not meant to be.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Haven’t seen wood ducks since relocating to Canada, but used to run into them occasionally in NJ — which is really a quite underrated place for birding of all kinds. Some species which seem more common up here than down in NJ are snowy owl, various grosbeaks, common loon, and believe it or not: porcupines. I saw my first some years back on a wooded roadside a few miles north of Maine. Nice story about the heron… how close did you get?

        Liked by 2 people

      • I was maybe 10 yards or so from the heron. It looked straight at me and then turned away. I had never thought of NJ as being a great place for wildlife. I actually grew up in northeastern PA, not far from NJ, but I wasn’t really into wildlife then…some missed opportunities, perhaps. I live in NC now, and I think we have a great selection of wildlife here year-round. I’d love to do an expedition in the Pacific Northwest sometime, though: northern WA, Vancouver, BC. I’d also love to visit Lake Louise one day, not just for the hiking, but for the wildlife, as well. And I have to admit, I am a little jealous you have snowy owls near you. They are so, so beautiful.

        Liked by 2 people

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